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7h Why do gyms play such loud music?
The Guardian
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Why do gyms play music so loudly? It’s like being in a nightclub. Even when wearing headphones to listen to one’s own music, it is impossible to block their music out.
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Yes, you CAN escape the nastiest side-effects of treating cancer 7h Updated Yes, you CAN escape the nastiest side-effects of treating cancer 
Daily Mail
Radiotherapy uses beams of radiation to damage cancer cells, and is highly effective against breast cancer - but it can raise the risk of heart attack.
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Mother-of-one, 25, describes battling through excruciating tissue disorder8h Updated Mother-of-one, 25, describes battling through excruciating tissue disorder
Daily Mail
Amy Miller, 25, from Ontario, Canada, was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome at age two. She was bullied so severely in high school for her appearance that she attempted suicide twice.
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8h Share your photos of the best and worst cycling infrastructure in your cities
The Guardian
Some cities feature spectacular bridges, bike paths and transport hubs designed with cyclists in mind, while others remain less than cycle-friendly. We want to see your examples, both good and bad
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GPs say they have become so preoccupied with targets they are failing to spot deadly conditions 9h Updated GPs say they have become so preoccupied with targets they are failing to spot deadly conditions 
Daily Mail
GPs feel their work has become increasingly fast-paced in recent years, a study by Barts Health NHS Trust and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry found.
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Woman, 30, has an eyelash transplant using hair from the back of her scalp10h Updated Woman, 30, has an eyelash transplant using hair from the back of her scalp
Daily Mail
Itinder Kaur, now 30, of London, lost a clump of lashes from the centre of her right eyelid when her friend accidentally dragged her across gravel while trying to help her up from her fall.
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Midwives are at risk of suffering painful back injuries by helping obese women to give birth11h Midwives are at risk of suffering painful back injuries by helping obese women to give birth
Daily Mail
Hospital staff in Britain are struggling with the physical strain of handling severely overweight women as soaring obesity levels mean half of mothers-to-be are now too fat.
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12h Reality TV 'encourages children to drink and smoke', study suggests
The Independent
Researchers say reality TV is a 'major potential driver of alcohol and tobacco consumption' in young Brits
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14h I am unable to reach orgasm through sex with my wife
The Guardian
I masturbated five times a week before getting married, and can still bring myself to orgasm that way, but through vaginal sex it doesn’t happen at all
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The truth about the healing powers of tumeric 14h The truth about the healing powers of tumeric 
Daily Mail
Curcumin may even improve the function of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, important for controlling blood sugar levels, as one early study, published in Diabetes Care in 2012, found.
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15h Herbivore Jade Facial Roller – can it improve my skin and bring me peace and harmony?
The Guardian
I’m not sure it is doing much for my complexion, but it is certainly a gorgeous addition to any bathroom I have no idea what facial rolling with gemstones does. I understand that it is popular with lifestyle bloggers and various Kardashian satellites and, if it is good enough for them, you may as well punch yourself on the nose for the good it will do you. But while jade, rose quartz and amethyst are on trend, the practice is thought to be an ancient one, with roots in Chinese alternative medicine. (That doesn’t mean it is good. Live bee acupuncture has been around a while, too.) Anyway, the thinking is that semi-precious stones have specific qualities. The roller I am testing, the £26
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Experts believe viruses may be the answer to beating superbugs20h Experts believe viruses may be the answer to beating superbugs
Daily Mail
Catherine Farrer from Dulwich, London, is pictured with her daughter Kate, 4, who is a Cystic Fibrosis sufferer. Caring for Kate has exposed her to the worrying realities of antibiotic resistance.
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20h The gay men breaking blood donation rules
BBC
The men believe who they have sex with should not prevent them from giving blood.
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Remote control to zap backache 21h Remote control to zap backache 
Daily Mail
Patients who had experienced lower back pain for up to 24 years - and had not benefited from other treatments - were helped by the device, according to a recent study.
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Bacon sandwiches and fried chicken can raise your risk of dementia21h Bacon sandwiches and fried chicken can raise your risk of dementia
Daily Mail
Over the past decade, scientists have established that AGEs can provoke the body to react defensively, creating dangerous chronic inflammation, particularly in our vital organs.
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22h Why those men in Lycra may be at risk of their bones crumbling
Daily Mail
When Joe Booth, 65, of Aldringham, Suffolk, was bending over to pick up a heavy shopping bag, there was a sharp jolt in his lower back.
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Fallen US soldiers have saved hundreds of lives by donating their organs in Europe22h Updated Fallen US soldiers have saved hundreds of lives by donating their organs in Europe
Daily Mail
In Germany, and other nearby countries, organ donations are more taboo than in the United States. In 2018, 2,000 of the 10,000 people waiting for an organ died on a barely-budging list.
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Frito-Lay recalls barbecue chips after different chips with milk allergens were mistakenly packed24h Frito-Lay recalls barbecue chips after different chips with milk allergens were mistakenly packed
Daily Mail
Frito-Lay voluntarily recalled its 7.75-ounce bags of Lay's Lightly Salted Barbecue Flavored Potato Chips after different chips, which contain undeclared dairy, were packed instead
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Personal care products send a child to the ER every 2 hours, study finds24h Personal care products send a child to the ER every 2 hours, study finds
Daily Mail
Every year, well over 4,000 children are poisoned or injured by hair, skin, and nail cosmetic products, according to a new Nationwide Children's Hospital study warning of cosmetics' dangers.
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Marijuana damages teen brains, top doctors say as they call for the drug to be banned for under-25s25h Updated Marijuana damages teen brains, top doctors say as they call for the drug to be banned for under-25s
Daily Mail
Dr Kenneth L Davis, CEO of Mount Sinai Health System, and Dr Mary Jeanne Kreek, of Rockefeller University, warn the studies we do have all show weed deals a blow to teen brains.
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Kansas teen, 15, survives after falling on a 10-inch knife which impaled his face and skull26h Updated Kansas teen, 15, survives after falling on a 10-inch knife which impaled his face and skull
Daily Mail
Eli Gregg, 15, from Redfield, Kansas, tripped and fell on a 10-inch knife on Thursday night. Doctors were able to remove the blade and Eli is not expected to suffer any long-term damage.
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Almost 5,000 cases of Pillsbury flour bags recalled after testing positive for E. coli27h Updated Almost 5,000 cases of Pillsbury flour bags recalled after testing positive for E. coli
Daily Mail
Manufacturers recalled the bags in 10 states on Friday. E. coli tends to fester in moisture. But a recent CDC investigation into E. coli-infected cookie dough found that's not always the case.
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Listeria outbreak: More affected hospitals named28h Listeria outbreak: More affected hospitals named
BBC
Eight hospitals have reported cases of listeria linked to sandwiches and salads eaten by patients.
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Breastmilk protects premature babies against deadly infection - but only if it contains antibody28h Breastmilk protects premature babies against deadly infection - but only if it contains antibody
Daily Mail
An antibody called IgA in breastmilk protects premature babies from a deadly gut infection. When mothers can't feed, a University of Pittsburgh study suggests donor milk be tested for IgA.
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Hope for millions of asthma sufferers after scientists chart every cell in human lungs29h Hope for millions of asthma sufferers after scientists chart every cell in human lungs
Daily Mail
The 'atlas' of the lungs by British scientists will lead to better understanding and treatment of asthma. The cells which produce mucous in asthmatics was found for the first time.
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Divorce likely to put weight on children, study finds29h Updated Divorce likely to put weight on children, study finds
BBC
Study compared the weights of children whose parents had broken up with those whose parents had not.
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30h Facebook posts 'better at predicting some health conditions' than demographic data, claim researchers
The Independent
'This information could provide additional information about disease management and exacerbation'
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Cybercriminals could hack into medical devices used in NHS hospitals31h Cybercriminals could hack into medical devices used in NHS hospitals
Daily Mail
New York cybersecurity firm CyberMDX revealed the flaws in NHS workstations, adding to concerns about the health service's online safety. (Pictured: The 2017 WannaCry attack).
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Woman, 20, with a 100° vertebrae was given just 24hours to live33h Updated Woman, 20, with a 100° vertebrae was given just 24hours to live
Daily Mail
Katie Krzyzanowski was born with neurofibromatosis, which causes tumours to form on nerve endings. This led the now 20-year-old, of Somerset, to develop scoliosis at four years old.
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36h Japan desperately needs daycare workers – but is rejecting those with children of their own
The Independent
Hundreds of thousands of childcare places need to be created for babies and toddlers – but discrimination against mothers-to-be is rife
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36h Updated Build it and they will bike: the second Bicycle Architecture Biennale – in pictures
The Guardian
15 projects from nine countries have been selected for the second
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37h I was an introvert with a grey life – until I learned to let go on stage
The Guardian
The more I stayed in, the more scared I became of going out. Signing up for improv classes helped my shyness to melt away A few years ago I watched a comedy troupe improvise an Uber journey through Nudist Narnia. I studied their joyous, earnest expressions. I took in how genuinely happy and safe they looked in their whimsy. “You joyful fools,” I thought. “Your vigour for life appals me.” Last year, my social anxiety was sky-high and my insomnia the worst it had ever been. Exhausted, I said no to every social invitation, but the more I stayed in, the more scared I became of going out. Work was stressful and adulthood felt so goal-oriented: work longer, run faster, cycle further, vegan harder.
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39h Why sleeptrackers could lead to the rise of insomnia – and orthosomnia
The Guardian
In our chronically sleep-deprived society, many are using gadgets and apps to measure the quantity and quality of their shut-eye. But they could be causing more harm than good For more than nine months, Alex Whitecross’s routine on waking was to check the data about his sleep on his fitness tracker. And then he would feel quite anxious. “I started getting paranoid about how much sleep I was getting,” he says. Whitecross, a computer-aided-design technician from south Wales, says he bought his tracker in order to measure exercise, but became interested in the sleep-monitoring function. “I’m a lighter sleeper than my fiance so I thought it would help me, but it ended up having the opposite effect.” Sometimes he would check it in the night and feel panicked about how many hours he had until his alarm would go off. In the morning, “I would wake up and look at it, and it would say I’d had five hours and 44 minutes sleep, and spent an hour and 25 minutes awake at night. It made me feel more tired, knowing how little sleep I’d got.” He noticed, as time went on, “I was getting less and less sleep as I was wearing it”.
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Prescription drugs sold illegally in Uganda 16 Jun 8:26pm Prescription drugs sold illegally in Uganda
BBC
The BBC has uncovered evidence that prescription drugs have been taken out of circulation by health workers and sold on illegally.
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What personalised medicine could mean for your health 16 Jun 7:34pm What personalised medicine could mean for your health
BBC
Technology is making it possible to tailor treatments to ever smaller groups of patients.
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16 Jun 7:01pm Half of Britons socialise with family and friends at most once a month
The Guardian
Lack of interaction is damaging sense of wellbeing, says Sainsbury’s Living Well Index Nearly half of Britons socialise with family and friends only once a month or less, according to a survey. The lack of human interaction is causing the nation’s sense of wellbeing to dwindle, the Sainsbury’s Living Well Index said.
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